Many of us at The Putney Inn have worked together for decades to excel at what we love. We love the satisfaction of success, success in providing exceptional service and in offering extraordinary food.

Guests have written that we are “stunning”. Travel & Leisure advises that, in any trip to New England, “The Putney Inn is well worth a detour.” We’ve been told that we are “much more than a pretty building with great food,” but that we are “a property with heart and soul.”

The secrets of three centuries rest deep within the walls of Vermont’s Putney Inn. Though much of our history is written, some has been passed down in the folklore of our area. Deeded by King George III to English army captain John Kathan in 1752, this 300-hectare land grant was the area’s first homestead. It was here on Captain Kathan’s land that the earliest settlers first discovered the magic of boiling maple syrup.

Remaining a farming homestead until the first quarter of the 1900s, the Kathan tract was then bought by the Catholic missionary order, The Society of Saint Edmund’s. In the very same spaces of today’s revelry, men of decades ago were ordained with priestly vows.

Vermont Interstate 91, built in the early 1960s – and destined to forever change the cultural landscape of Vermont – divided the seminary grounds. As one can imagine, the property was no longer ideal as a religious retreat.

But a new vision appeared. Businessmen and women rallied their ingenuity and their resources to create what for the last forty years has been The Putney Inn. The main farmhouse was converted, the overnight guest rooms were built, and the Miller barn from Dummerston was moved and reconstructed to create the center dining space. And the students of erstwhile Windham College (which was located on the present-day site of Landmark College) breathed life to the bar.

For the last thirty years, Vermont’s Putney Inn has been under the proprietorship of the Ziter family. Rebounding from a devastating fire in 1986, with extraordinary individuals who devoted their heart and soul to the endeavor, the family has created a business with enduring heart and soul.

In September of 2014 the Inn was sold to Sam Patel owner of the Colonial Motel in Brattleboro VT. Working over the next year the Inn has had major revisions to the hotel and rooms sections with a completely new office space. While the restaurant awaits a new owner and completion, the inn is open for business.